Post by Category : US Northeast

Penn Live: COLSTON MOORE OBITUARY

Sad news about a brilliant lady with a brilliant mind, a fellow Freecycle Moderator.

https://obits.pennlive.com/us/obituaries/pennlive/name/colston-moore-obituary?id=35452167

Betsy’s Down-sizing Story: One member’s experience

MY DOWNSIZING JOURNEY: RE-EVALUATING THE MEANING OF THINGS

I’ve moved a total of 16 times as an adult. Many of these moves were not my choice. Properties sold, rent increases, life changes. These moves are typical for many people. With moving comes downsizing, especially when moving to a smaller place. As we age, we often do this. 

My last move was to a smaller apartment where I live by myself. It’s half the size of my previous apartment but fortunately, it is efficiently designed. My initial impression was not very positive. The apartments in my building are all the same – square beige-colored boxes with none of the character or personality that old houses in these neighborhoods have. Because my ‘box’ is half the size of my last apartment, I had to make a lot of decisions. This was a perfect case of having to down-size. I no longer had the storage space to keep everything I owned.

I used to pack everything when I moved. All my empty wine bottles, memorabilia – school citations, high school play programs, every class picture of every child I was friends with – would follow me like toilet paper on a shoe. As I put each item in a box, I considered whether it was something I wanted or felt I might need, the latter being a holdover from my mom’s generation who grew up during the depression. One of my earlier moves was cross-country causing me to let go of things I thought I would never use again – like my camping equipment. Although I haven’t needed it, I still have regrets about the loss. With things the way they are in the world, I sometimes think camping equipment might come in handy! Having second thoughts is the bane of purging. However, a good resource I have found is The Freecycle Network. People post things they don’t want, then other people make arrangements to take them. I am keeping my eye out for a tent and propane cookstove. I can also post things that I’m looking for, like camping equipment! 

My biggest regret when I purged during past moves was in getting rid of some mementos representing past experiences. Things like old b/w photographs of myself in school plays, for instance. As was my high school artwork, darn it.  

What I continue to hold onto and will never throw out is my collection of ticket stubs from every concert I’ve ever attended, starting with Jethro Tull in 1973. I plan to collage them at some point at a friend’s suggestion. 

The biggest challenge for me when downsizing is taking the context away. When I have to make myself let go of something that  represents memories, I remind myself that the item in question is simply a thing. Altho it can be difficult, I can let go of attachment. The decision of whether to keep or give away rests on what purpose it serves and does it bring me joy. I have held onto gifts from friends I’ve lost touch with over the last 40 plus years. The items themselves have no meaning so I took some advice and photographed them before they found their final resting place, be it a yard sale or posted on The Freecycle Network.

If I had to do it over, I would do the same thing I did when clearing out a friend’s apartment recently: Make a list of the furniture  including appliances; take photos; decide what to keep then decide what to sell on Craig’s List or at a consignment shop. The rest gets posted on The Freecycle Network or dropped off at a local thrift store like Boomerangs. I would also ask friends if they could use the items I culled. I did this for my friend but have never been that organized myself. Another suggestion is to put the things I couldn’t quite let go of in a box and after a year, donate it.

One later move had to be done quickly. It was time to pare my book collection. This is perhaps the biggest challenge that most people face. I based my decision on keeping books that I learned the most from and that had changed my life (mostly spiritual); I kept my most favorite authors whose writing styles impressed me (Pearls S. Buck, Louise Erdrich); and I kept those that I had enjoyed the most – ones that I might actually read again (The Hobbit/Lord of the Rings Trilogy). The rest I gave away, mostly in a yard sale. The process was a bit gut-wrenching, but once they were gone, I made peace with my decision.

The Freecycle Network came thru when I posted my friend’s book collection. After choosing a selection she might want to keep, the rest were grouped in categories and listed. It was gratifying when the books went to people who wanted them and came to pick them up.

My advice to anyone who has to downsize to a smaller place is to sit with the understanding that you are not your things. Start with the practical items and ask yourself: do I use this, will I use this? Can I replace this if I should ever need it? The same goes with clothing – do I wear this, will I wear it, can I replace it? Objects can be viewed as, does it bring you joy? Will a photo of it suffice? And there are all those duplicate things we own. Do I really need four extension cords? Downsizing is a process. Give yourself enough time so as to eliminate the feeling of panic. Relive memories as you go through your lifetime of things, take  photos and then let them go. It can feel like a burden has been lifted. Keep only the most precious things so that where you land, your new home is not cluttered but reflects who you are and what you love..

My views about stuff have changed a lot since my first moves as an adult. I was a much more possessive person and felt very attached to my things. They were part of my identity. Now that I am older and more mature, my things are a reflection of what I enjoy. I am no longer possessed by them. Sometimes I play a game where I ask myself, what could I never, ever get rid of? You’d be surprised at how unimportant most of the things you have are.

Moving is one of the most stressful things we can go through. Even when it’s a move to a better situation, it’s going to be difficult. If you have to downsize or want to downsize, you can. You can do it. Some steps you have to take may feel painful, but remember, it’s only things. As much as you love an object, it can’t love you back. Keep only those that you cherish.

PS. One last thought, what you have to give away could be to someone who needs it more than you. That’s why The Freecycle Network is an important catalyst. One person’s shit could make another person’s garden grow.

B. Lenora 1/26/22 (Somerville, MA)

The Greenfield Recorder: No ‘Clean Sweep’ Bulky Waste Recycling Day planned this fall

Donovan encourages residents to call ahead to make sure a store can accept your equipment on the day you plan to visit. Reusable items may also be offered for free on an online sharing group, such as freecycle.org or a Facebook group.

Used building materials (in good condition) can be donated for reuse at the following locations. Donovan advises to call prior to delivery to confirm that your materials will be accepted, or to arrange for free pickup. Deconstruction services may be offered, and items might be tax-deductible.

https://www.recorder.com/No–Clean-Sweep–Bulky-Waste-Recycling-Day-planned-this-fall-43076895

The Boston Globe: How green are you? For Earth Day, check your habits against this list of planet-friendly choices

Fix before tossing, and donate items you no longer use so someone else can. Consider buying (and selling) consignment and secondhand. Groups such as Freecycle (https://www.freecycle.org/) and the Buy Nothing project (https://buynothingproject.org/) put you in touch with people nearby gifting usable goods, building a sense of generosity and community in the process.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/2021/04/21/lifestyle/how-green-are-you-earth-day-check-your-habits-against-this-list-planet-friendly-choices/

Northwest Herald: Guidry: Reduce e-waste by selling, donating, recycling old electronics

Many computer manufacturers and stores provide trade-in programs. Some, such as Apple, even might offer gift cards depending on the value of the device. You also can sell your electronics via sites such as Craigslist, eBay or Facebook Marketplace, as well as offer them for free on FreeCycle.

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WPVI-TV: What’s the Deal: Saving money on furniture

Finally, there’s the place where you can save the most.

Craig’s list, Freecycle and yard sales, estate sales and auctions: there are websites and apps that can help you find them.

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The Daily News of Newburyport: Boomer Talk: The upside of downsizing

Freecycle is an online network (www.freecycle.org) where one’s trash becomes another’s treasure. No money is exchanged, but someone is happy to come to your home and carry the items away.

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The Daily News of Newburyport: Beyond the Bin: Giving new life to old items

Freecycle is the original online recycling community. As its name implies, it is dedicated only to things offered for free. Used, new and unique items show up daily. This is the best platform for listing imperfect or incomplete items. To join Freecycle, visit https://tinyurl.com/y5sza74t, click on “Join this group,” and follow the prompts.

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NorthEndWaterfront.com:Guide to an Eco-Friendly September 1st in the North End

FreeCycle is a grassroots organization kept running from the dedication of volunteers who want to help keep items out of landfills by providing a place to post free items that other people in your community can pickup. Anything can be posted here as long as it is legal and appropriate for any age. Sign up today and start searching for a new home for your unwanted items.

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The New York Times: Three Things You Can Do: Swap, Share and Donate

Have you ever seen lightly used household items — things like lamps, books, toys, furniture and clothes — piled up on the curbside and wondered if somebody wouldn’t want that stuff?

The answer is probably yes, and it might be easier than you think to connect your unwanted things with new owners.

One way to do that is through apps and websites. Craigslist, Bunz, Listia and Freecycle allow you to swap or give away just about anything. People often use Meetup to get together and swap records, books and clothes.

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