Post by Category : New Zealand

New zealand herald: Freecycle – turning trash into treasures

There have been some curious packages arriving in Carrie Bolton’s Te Atatu mailbox over the past few months, bulky ones that rattle when shaken. But Bolton is unconcerned. This part-time artist put a call out on the Freecycle website for the coloured plastic tags that seal bread packets. She wanted them to complete a sculpture she’s been working on – and her fellow members responded enthusiastically.

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Auckland stuff.co.nz: Giveaway site a treasure find

Also helping west Aucklanders to trade their trash for treasure is the Waitakere NZ Freecycle website which has over 900 members.

The items listed on the Freecycle website vary from people giving away baby Mexican fish, firewood and banana crates to wanted pleas for gumboots.

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NZHerald.co.nz: Life & Style Next Article: Architect draws experience from the path less travelled Freecycle – turning trash into treasures

There have been some curious packages arriving in Carrie Bolton’s Te Atatu mailbox over the past few months, bulky ones that rattle when shaken. But Bolton is unconcerned. This part-time artist put a call out on the Freecycle website for the coloured plastic tags that seal bread packets. She wanted them to complete a sculpture she’s been working on – and her fellow members responded enthusiastically.

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Radio New Zealand:Sunday, 7 August 2011: The Moneyless Economy

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New Zealand Herald: It’s easy being green

On the Freecycle website you can list items you no longer need to give away. Is there a similar website for vegetable/fruit swapping?

Ooooby is a great local website, also My Garden. Green Urban Living also has a community forum where you can swap seeds, grafting wood, chooks or even small children (just kidding).

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Dunedin Patch: Award Grows Out of Woman’s Organic Garden

Mink, also an originating member who helped write the bylaws of the Dunedin Community Garden Association, also moderates two online networks for like-minded people — the Clearwater Freecycle Group, a group that recycles items through free exchange, and Dunedin Transitions, a movement working to move communities away from oil dependency.

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Capital Times:Reduce, Reuse, Freecycle

Fashion magazines, a cast iron bath, recipe books, fish food, an oven and a sofa, what do these things have in common? You can get them all for free on Freecycle.org, right here in Wellington.
The Freecycle Network is a worldwide green initiative with over 7.5 million users – all advertising the things they no longer want, or the things they’re keen to snap up for free.
Catherine Hatfield of Lower Hutt is offering up the fashion magazines, and says the incentive for her to use the service is that she’d “prefer to see things with life left in them used by someone else rather than going to a landfill.”

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Hawke’s Bay today:Don’t throw your trash away, offer it on Freecycle

Too much useable waste is ending up in the landfill and one new Bay resident has started a group to get rid of unwanted, but non-recyclable goodies.

Napier resident Dani Bellamy has started a Freecycle group – a non-profit organisation dedicated to reuse of unwanted goods.

Freecycle members go online to post their unwanted items and other members can reply to the post to claim the item.

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The Aucklander:Free to a good home

In her outstretched arms, she holds a picnic hamper and a Playdough machine that she’ll list on Freecycle this week. Free to a good home.

The West Harbour resident is a fervent advocate of the free online trading site.

“The bed, television cabinet, beanbag, stereo – over time we’ve been able to furnish this whole room.”

Freecycle is a global online community operating on the premise that one person’s trash is another’s treasure. Through the Auckland website, members can request items or offer up things they no longer need. It’s free to use and no money is exchanged between members.

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Canada.com: Online recyclers expand annual weekend giveaway

Online social networking has transformed what used to be an annual spring cleaning weekend and turned it into an ongoing virtual highway that allows people to get rid of unwanted items all year.

This weekend marks Nanaimo’s recycle rendezvous, where people lug unwanted items, such as furniture, bikes or silverware, to the curb with the hope that someone else may find treasure in their junk. But these scheduled days, usually organized by municipal governments, have become much more to those who have found a new medium for their giveaways.

More than seven million people around the globe have joined The Freecycle Network, a non-profit group of members who give stuff away in their local areas. This rapidly expanding movement has created a global and growing phenomenon. And the concept is simple. People sign up to the local chapter and start posting the items they no longer use. When people respond, the owners get to choose who gets the material. The customer then travels to pick it up.

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