Post by Category : Blog

CT on a budget: LOVE Freecycle!

I needed another table in order to be able to seat all that are coming to a Christmas party that I am hosting. I looked on line, these go for $50 for the cheapo, plastic topped ones to more like $100 and up for study, industrial ones. Today, I had college boy with his truck pick up and deliver a Freecyled 6 foot, folding party table. While there are a few scratches in the top, wood grain finish, this is an all steel table that will more than suit my needs, especially as I plan on covering it with a table cloth! Very, very happy to now own this, my cost? just a tip to college boy to help cover his gas. Well worth it!

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GETMEADOGGYBAG: Freecycle

If you aren’t using freecycle, you’re not living. Freecycle is a website where you can get, and give away, useful items, for free. You can get some amazing things from there, and you can get rid of a lot of stuff that you may think is crap. The basic philosophy behind freecycle is finding a use for things that would otherwise end up in a landfill.

How does it work? Visit http://www.freecycle.org/group/nz/. Register. Check the listings. Sign up to receive the emails. If you have something to give away, make a post, if you have something you want, make a post. There are a lot of generous people out there and if you let people know you need something, you will be surprised how many people are willing to help.

I have tried to give something away on freecycle each time I have picked something up. To keep the balance right, if you will. Here are some examples of how freecycle has worked for me:

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ChicagoNow: The Do’s and Don’ts of Successfully Getting Free Stuff

I even sold some items on Craigslist. Then there were some other items that weren’t really sellable in my opinion. A few odds and ends. I decided to list them on freecycle. Freecycle is a site in which you offer items that you don’t want to others for free. Its based on the premise of recycling and keeping things out of the landfill.

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Blogher.com: The Luxury of Giving: Freecycling and Frugality

This freecycling thing is my latest fixation. Not a week goes by that my husband doesn’t come home to hear what thing went that day! My local community is a bustling one, and my offers generally go in the first 48 hours. My basement is growing, suddenly unburdened by excess.

Technically, it is a “loss” of money, unless one is receiving the items. Literal frugality would demand that I should be Ebaying these suckers and getting some profit for myself, no matter how minor. But I won’t do that. For me, having the free space in my household and knowing that someone else is going to enjoy the items is worth far more than waiting and waiting to make a few bucks.

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Carol’s Musings: Freecycle

The Corner Shop” at Swansea’s Llansamlet recycling centre.

Take your rubbish to the tip, and whatever is remotely usable drop in at the shop. Whilst you’re there, see if there is anything you fancy for £1. Proceeds go to charity. I just hope that they check for hidden gems before they put items on the shelves.

It saves half decent stuff going to landfill, or maybe saves the person who brings stuff a separate journey to donate elsewhere.

Maybe more of these will start up once the news gets around.

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Miles & Ozzie: freecycle

freecycle is by no means anything new. but some folks are not familiar with it. basically it works like this: are you looking for something very specific? post an ad. do you have something in your garage/basement/closet that needs a new home? post an ad. it’s that simple. what’s even better is you can put what you have to offer out on your porch with the new owners name on it for them to pick up. you don’t have to wait around. you don’t have to answer your door. same goes for when you want something. just ask for porch pickup and it’s yours.

and it’s all free.

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Shift Frequency: Laura Bruno ~ Freecycle

I first discovered freecycle several years ago while living in Northern California. After having relocated from Sedona Arizona and given away much of our furniture, I wondered if we could be on the receiving end of so much abundance. While married, I moved every 2-12 months — usually around the 6 month mark — so I have given away a lot of furniture in my day! I figured I could balance the scales a bit by appearing when someone else needed to relieve themselves of stuff. I forget how I found freecycle, but I love the idea that one person’s junk can become another’s treasure. After receiving an armoire and recliner chair, I decided to list some of our items that hadn’t found a place in our new California home. I loved this zero money exchange that blessed both parties by clearing energy out the old and invigorating the new. I also loved that freecycle kept many perfectly usable (but less likely to sell) items out of the landfill.

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Yahoo News: Where to Get The Most Money For Your Used Gadgets

A final option is Freecycle. The Freecycle Network has over 5000 groups around the world that match people getting rid of old items with those who want it. You won’t make any money with this one, but it may keep things that you think are junk from going into the landfill.

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TechHive: Get back to your roots with vintage video games

Where to buy

Freecycle and Craigslist are two great places to get started. Freecycle is a network of thousands of members-only mailing lists, localized by geographical region. Members give stuff away for free to others who can use that stuff. The goal: Keep things out of landfills by encouraging reuse. I’ve used the service before to snag stuff like vintage Macs and a Commodore Amiga, complete with a big crate of classic Amiga games. The online classified service Craigslist is also a great place to find stuff for free or at a very low cost from people looking to make space in their family room.

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Lincoln courier: ReClaim, ReCycle, ReConstruct

The ReClaimer is certainly not alone in this mindset. Today’s ReClaimer Blog will put a spotlight on The Freecycle Network(TM).

A concept that was launched in one city in the United States (US) has since grown to international and global scope. In May of 2003, Freecycle founder Deron Beal organized an online email group of contacts representing a group of non-profit organizations in Tucson, Arizona. The online contact network was necessary to streamline and make highly efficient a previously time-consuming process of offering unwanted or donated items to multiple organizations in the Tucson area. Originally fostered by the organization RISE, which at the time provided recycling services to downtown Tucson businesses, The Freecycling Network (TM) grew into a online network that now spans the globe and has incorporated the efforts of individuals and groups in 85 countries.

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