Post by Category : US Southwest

Arizona Daily Sun:Time Out: Still just chickens. No eggs.

Back at home, I looked in on the chicks. The injured birds looked to be in bad shape. Napoleon (as I’d christened the bully chick that morning) was angry and aggressive. What am I going to do? I did not have it in me to dispatch Napoleon. And so, in my time of crisis, I turned to Freecycle.

If you don’t know about Freecycle, you should. It’s a national network of people, linked on the Internet, who give things away and ask for things. The rule is, everything is free. For example, when I got a new printer for Christmas, I posted an offer for my old printer on Freecycle. When someone responded to the posting, we arranged for them to pick up the old printer.

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Arizona Daily Star: Bring some, take some, for free

Bring some, take some, for free
Tucson-based group sponsoring ‘no strings attached’ meet-ups

The guests have gone, the holiday hullabaloo hushed.

What’s left: stuff. Ribbons. Wrapping paper. And an assortment of misguided gifts and other unwanted items that promise to take up space for the next year, if not forever.

Rather than throw these things away, wouldn’t it be great to give them to someone who could love them – and even get something you truly want in return?

Freecycle.org, founded by Deron Beal on May 1, 2003, enables exactly that.

Beal created the website so that locals could sign up on a list server to unload items or request things they want to find.

Beal says the website he founded in Tucson now serves communities in more than 110 countries, and he expects to reach 10 million participants worldwide this year.

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Green Valley News: Freecycle! Exchange of used treasures a hit in GV, Sahuarita

Few left empty-handed Saturday from Green Valley library’s first “Freecycle” event held as part of a Pima County Post Holiday Swap of free stuff.

True to its name, there were some holiday-themed items in the mix — all brought by winter visitors, year-round residents, out-of-towners and grandparents with kids in tow. Everybody learned more about the recycling concept and maybe even got some grins trying on wigs, handmade scarves, hats and other things that materialized.

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Snellville Patch: Moms Talk: A New Year, A New Pile of Stuff

If I’m not selling, I usually end up stuffing things in bags and hauling them to Goodwill, but I’ve recently been looking at some other options. I have friends who use Freecycle and love it. You just post your unwanted stuff, and people will come pick it up. Easy as pie!

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Santa Fe College: Join the FreeCycle Movement!

In times of economic and environmental crisis we need to rely on our community members for support!

You have the chance to support the Santa Fe community. Bring all of your unwanted and gently-used clothing, accessories, household appliances, books, and miscellaneous(but appropriate) items to the front desk of the S Building during normal business hours until June 7. Then, on Wednesday, June 8 from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the S Breezeway, those items will be placed out for FreeCycle. You can leave your items for someone else to use, and find a few things for yourself, all for free! It’s like a free yard sale that’s good for you AND the environment!

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Camp Verde Bugle: Letter: How Mother Earth has benefited me

Freecycle – “It’s a grassroots and entirely nonprofit movement of people who are giving (and getting) stuff for free in their own towns. It’s all about reuse and keeping good stuff out of landfills.” Get your spring cleaning done and offer unwanted items on www.freecycle.org. I have seen tools, computers, stereos, televisions, camper truck shells, sheds, clothing, carseats, tile, bamboo flooring, sinks, truck tool boxes, blowers, lawnmowers, washers, dryers, beds, pavers, plants, railroad ties, fencing, chickens . . . you name it. As long as you offer it free, you can list it.

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Arizona Daily Star: Libraries host community gift-swap

The event was in partnership with Freecycle, a nonprofit, volunteer-based organization that allows people who have unwanted items to go online and swap usable things to help keep stuff out of landfills.

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Peninsula Press: Freecycle gains popularity in Palo Alto – website helps locals

Freecycle.org is a website that connects local residents who want to get rid of old furniture and household items with people in the community who will take them. Unlike goods listed on other popular e-commerce sites like eBay and craigslist, everything listed on freecycle.org is free. The site is gaining popularity in Palo Alto, and in this video, users share their experiences using the site and discuss the growing trend of “freecylcing.”

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KVOA: Freecycle that unwanted Christmas gift

You can also try the Freecycle Network – an internet-based exchange network that started in Tucson in 2003, and has spread nationally. Freeycle lets people “go green” – members post stuff to give away that would’ve otherwise wound up in a landfill.

If you’re about to throw that gift in the trash, put it up on Freecycle instead – it may just be exactly what someone else wanted. While you’re there, you may even see someone giving away the item that was missing from under your tree.

To become a member of the Tucson Freecycle Network, go to:
http://groups.freecycle.org/freecycle/

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Reno News Review: Hoophouse hoopla

Error No. 1: I paid for lumber. Use used 2-by-4s. You might try Reno Freecycle, http://groups.freecycle.org/RenoFreecycle .

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