Post by Category : UK

Caravan Times: Freecycle On Your Holiday

The site is inviting guest to do more than just chuck their unwanted holiday accessories. They want anything unwanted that can be used again to be left at designated areas around their site. This way they can be reused by other guests instead of taking up at dump sites and landfills across the country.

The freecycling scheme was introduced in the 2017 summer season and there has been a great following for the idea. The things that have been left behind are all you need for a great day at the beach. Buckets and spades, beach balls, rubber rings and many other items have been left for the enjoyment any and everyone at the park.

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The Sun: SMART SPENDING Here’s how you save money on re-decorating your home

Find it on Freecycle

If you’re after a new furniture head to Freecycle or Gumtree and sift through all of the adverts. Furniture is often free, or super cheap, to those willing to collect it. You never know, someone might be trying to get rid of the sofa of your dreams.

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Ipswich Star: Learn how to live more sustainably from the experts

They use waste wood and insulation offcuts from a nearby industrial estate, have vegetable beds made from “scrounged” materials and got a greenhouse through Freecycle, an online site where people give away unwanted goods to keep them out of landfill.

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The Guardian: The City Is Ours review – will vertical forests and smart street lights really save the planet?

It’s the same story in the final London-themed section, where a big interactive map on a screen highlights 25 worthy initiatives across the city, from Open Data Camden – a project to put 300 different datasets online, on everything from parking bays and planning applications to housing stock and road accidents – to Museum Freecycle in Kennington, a hub that allows museums to share unwanted items. The captions and photos that pop up on the screen will thankfully be augmented by real life discussions every Thursday, when each of the 25 groups will host a lunchtime event.

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Cambridge News: You don’t have to buy into Christmas consumerism – join the “free” revolution

It may be the most wonderful time of the year, but there is a growing army of Cambridgeshire folk shunning the consumer frenzy that surrounds the festive season.
With UK advertisers spending an estimated £5.6 billion in the run-up to Christmas, Brits are whipped up into a buying bonanza – with many spending beyond their means.

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Bucks Free Press: OPINION: Colin Baker – Clearing out the ‘man drawer’

Until you discover Freecycle. What a greatbrilliant initiative. I know some people have reason to want to realise some cash for their unwanted goods, but many of us just want to get rid of them and find the process less painful because they are going where they are really wanted.

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HuffPost: How Much Enough Is Enough?

I admit to owning close to 100 pairs of shoes and that I could go for a couple of months of not doing laundry before I’d run out of clean underwear. I live in an age of super abundance, and it is this super abundance that helps organization like The Freecycle Network thrive and keeps Goodwill stores stocked with merchandise. (If you’ve never heard of Freecycle, it is a free member-organization where people post items they have extra of or would like to donate and others post what they need to see if anyone can fulfill that need. The objective is to keep stuff out of landfills.)

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FT.com: Fruits of frugality: how to restore a greenhouse on a tiny budget

A cheaper option may be Gumtree or Freecycle — a website where people give things away. Freecycle is inevitably random — new posts recently ranged from rose bushes and an upright piano to square crockery, 30 bags of plaster and costume jewellery. But while the rain pours down, I have time to wait.

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Scotsman: Cant find it on eBay? Try these online shopping alternatives

For free second-hand goods: Freecycle
With more than nine million users worldwide currently Freecycle is more of a movement than a website. This non-profit organisation’s main aim is to avoid furniture, clothing and other items becoming landfill waste unnecessarily. Nearly six thousand groups (organised by location) can be found by searching the main Freecycle website’s database and users can list anything they no longer need but deem worthy of re-homing for anyone to claim. It’s recycling at its best and – as the name suggests – entirely free. https://www.freecycle.org

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Londonist: Share To Save Cash In London

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