Post by Category : International

Craftingagreenworld.com : Kid Mosaic: Dyed Beans in an Upcycled CD Case

: If you want to make this kid mosaic project with a group of children, old-style CD cases are just the kind of thing that you could ask for on Freecycle or Facebook; loads of people have junk like that kicking around their houses because they don’t want to trash it. They’d LOVE to pass the responsibility on to you.

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Hover.com: Hover Stories: Deron Beal from Freecycle

Everyone has a bunch of junk lying around their house that they have no idea what to do with. Maybe it’s an old iPhone that you were going to try and sell but 3 new iPhones have come along since. Maybe it’s a stack of old textbooks from school. Or maybe it’s an ugly chair that clashes with everything in your living room. Or a broken food processor. Or a…you get the idea.

Deron Beal has set out to solve this problem with his website Freecycle.org, which has helped many unwanted items find new homes — 32,000 items a day, to be exact.

“Freecycle’s mission is really to make it easier to give something away than to throw it away,” Deron explains.

With online communities set up all over the world, 9 million members have used Freecycle to breathe new life into things that would have otherwise ended up in landfills. In the past year alone, if you were to pile the items gifted through Freecycle into garbage trucks, it would be 15 times the height of Mt. Everest!

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DesignGood.com: 9 Ways to Rock Your World for Free

3. Freecycle

Check it out if you want to: Find items you need for free (or get rid of stuff you don’t need).

Freecycle is a network of people who are giving (and getting) stuff for free in their own towns. If you’re cleaning house and feel bad about throwing a ton of stuff out, list it on Freecycle. If you’re looking for random bits and bobs, check out what your community has listed. Membership is free, so you have nothing to lose. And anything is fair game, as long as it’s legal and appropriate for all ages. Find if there’s a group near you.

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DIY Network.com: 12 Creative Headboards

Don’t be afraid to think outside the box when it comes to headboards: Old doors, windows and other unexpected items can all make fantastic backdrops for your bed. Take a look at these inventive headboards to get ideas for your own bedroom.

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The Next Women Business Magazine: How to survive working from home

3. Make a list of the things you miss from the large office infrastructure – but my guess is that infrastructure is overrated. You can buy/rent/borrow/loan and even freecycle most items on your list.

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Make Craft: DIY Boot Birdhouse

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BHG.Com: Create Savvy Storage by Repurposing

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You Tube: TimeBank Tom signs up for Freecycle

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Yahoo Voices: The beauty of Freecycling

Recently I had a massive clear out of things in my house to make room for some needed renovations. I unloaded books, old televisions, furniture, you name it. In early early stages of shifting I became very disappointed with many of the charities I tried to donate things to. I found their attitude absolutely appalling and some of their comments insulting. I was about to give up entirely and just leave everything I didn’t want in my front garden to let the neighborhood have a free for all. Then I stumbled upon a beautiful website called Freecycle.org.

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Earth911.com: A Decade of Sharing: The Freecycle Network Turns 10

At some point, most of us have probably given away things we didn’t need to friends or family members. But what should you do when you don’t know anyone who wants the leftover dirt from your gardening project or your old lawnmower? One solution is to check out The Freecycle Network, an organization that encourages people to participate in a culture of giving.

Freecycle, a website founded in May of 2003 by Deron Beal of Tucson, Ariz., began when Beal wanted to donate a bed, but couldn’t find any local organizations willing to accept one. Beal wanted to create a way for people to give away items that still had value, but that might otherwise end up in a landfill. To solve the problem, Beal got together a small group of friends interested in sharing the things they no longer needed, and that initial group has grown into a project that boasts 9 million members in more than 110 countries.

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