Post by Category : Australia

The Maitland Mercury:The simple act of giving can make such a difference

Gillieston Heights man Paul Clyne is leading by example when it comes to promoting the value of sharing and giving.
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He is the administrator of Freecycle.org, a website that allows people to advertise items that they are willing to give away for free to a good home.

During his time with the website, Mr Clyne has repaired and given away about 130 computers to Hunter ­residents who didn’t have the means to go out and buy the latest laptop, gizmo or gadget.

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Fraser Coast Chronicle:Hervey Bay Mum Giving away Christmas Hampers via Freecycle

A Hervey Bay Mum of three had her facebook messenger feed in overload when she posted she was giving away $300 worth of groceries.

Melissa Wilkin’s posted on Facebook’s Freecycle Maryborough Hervey Bay QLD she was giving away $300 worth of food, in the lead up to Christmas, to a family in need.

Within a minute there were responses to her post.

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Gladstone Observer:Life a little easier for girl in wheelchair thanks to help

THANKS to the kindness of a CQ Frames and Trusses employee, and Facebook, Joanne Mison will experience a little less back strain from now on.

Joanne’s seven-year-old daughter Kassidy Ashworth has cerebral palsy so uses a wheelchair.

Suffering from a spinal infection, Joanne had difficulty lifting the wheelchair over the step at the front door of their home.

On Saturday, February 1, Joanne created a post on the Facebook page Freecycle Gladstone.

The page allows group members to post items they no longer want or need, for another group member to take off their hands.

Members also make posts regarding items they need for projects.

Joanne asked for ideas on how to make a ramp at the front door to give easier access for Kassidy’s wheelchair.

CQ Frames and Trusses hardware manager Darrin Bradbury offered his assistance for the task by supplying the timber and handiwork.

“It’s just a small part of our material and a friend (Wayne Price) came to help and fit it too,” Darrin said.

Joanne said she had not been expecting the help she received.

“I’m doing the biggest clean-out of the house at the moment, which is the only reason I’m on the group (Freecycle Gladstone),” she said.

“Darrin’s response was a bit of a shock to me.”

Darrin said he was happy to help.

“As long as it can make Joanne and Kass’ life a little easier, it’s put a smile on my face,” he said.

Darrin and Wayne spent more than an hour last Wednesday morning building and fitting the ramp.

“The majority of things you do these days cost money, so I am very thankful,” Joanne said.

Darrin said it was a pleasure to be there when Kassidy arrived home from school, to see the difference he and Wayne had made.

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The Sydney Morning Herald: Freecycle changes the adage: Just as good to give as to receive

‘I only own four items in this whole apartment,” Galina Globug said.

Ms Globug is one of 6.6 million people worldwide who give – and receive – unwanted things in a global environmental initiative called Freecycle. Its motto: ”changing the world, one gift at a time”.

Her eastern suburbs flat contains a bed, a wardrobe, a barbecue, a fridge, a dryer, a dresser, a gas heater, a cheese stand and a kitchen table. All were given to her for free.

”Oh, and a 40-inch TV,” the university student said.
”It’s pretty nifty. If people have stuff they don’t want it’s better than throwing it in the dump. It’s like recycling it back to the community.”

In return, Ms Globug recently offered some small plastic pots and glass jars to her Freecycle community.

The co-ordinator of one Freecycle group in Sydney, Tracy Getts, says as long as the goods – whether a bike, bubble wrap or a bed – are free, legal and suitable for all ages, they can be traded on the site for no cost. There are also no rules in how much people can take, compared to what they give, she said.

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Central Telegraph.com: Freecycle Gladstone is a positive place to get creative

THE saying one man’s trash, is another man’s treasure rings true for Facebook group Freecycle Gladstone.

Robin MacDonald has been one of the admins of the Facebook group for the past year, and since he signed up about 2000 more people joined.

Members of the group post their unwanted items for others to use.

“It helps people get rid of items they can’t get rid of themselves.”

Their old-fashioned values and strict rules of the use of please and thank you have resulted in a positive and friendly Facebook group.

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The West Australian: Stock exchange the growing way to change

Louise King runs the Freecycling Perth website, which has more than 8000 members who give away goods they no longer want, no strings attached. “My whole yard is paved with pavers from Freecycle,” Mrs King said.

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The Age.com: Online recycling the gift that keeps on giving

The last time you peered into your shed or spare room, did you look at all the unused items and wonder: why do I have so much stuff? If the answer is ”yes”, you’re not alone. A 2008 report by the Australia Institute states that 88 per cent of Australian homes have at least one cluttered room and that ”four in 10 Australians say they feel anxious, guilty or depressed about the clutter in their homes”.

Little wonder then that Australia is part of a worldwide backlash against consumerism. One of the big ideas is so-called ”collaborative consumption” – the notion that we can share resources, rather than having to own them individually. And this is where Freecycle comes in.

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NEWS.com.au: Join the feel-good recycling drive

IT’S so easy to toss out things we no longer have use for. Everything from toasters to bed linen and outgrown children’s toys hits the footpath faster than a fashion trend hits the back of the wardrobe.

Council clean-ups are a hub of activity, with the scrap metal merchants doing a roaring trade and residents touring the streets to find unwanted treasures before the council trucks snake their way through the suburbs.

Savvy owners can make a dollar or two buying and selling on eBay or Gumtree, but the vast majority of us are consigned to binning what we no longer like or need.

Still, in a world cluttered with waste, there is a nagging sense of contributing to the problem of landfill. So what other options are there?

In fact, there are plenty.

FEEL-GOOD FREECYCLING

One of the most innovative solutions is freecycle.org.

Now in Australia, this US-based organisation, which began as a recycling drive in Arizona and is operating in 110 countries, recently celebrated its 10th birthday.

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Newcastle Herald: Freecycle: Getting stuff for nothing

PEOPLE are giving stuff away for free as part of a movement that has bloomed in the Hunter.

Groups have sprung up in Lake Macquarie, Newcastle, Maitland, Port Stephens, Singleton and Muswellbrook linking with freecycle.org

They are part of the Freecycle Network, which began in 2003 in Arizona in the US.

It has spread to 85 countries, with thousands of groups and millions of members.

Nicole Chin, of Morisset Park, started the Lake Macquarie group when she moved from Sydney.

‘‘I had a lot of stuff I wanted to get rid of, but it was too good to go into a skip bin,’’ Ms Chin said.

Ms Chin said the site was free to join. Items were given away for free and could not be bought or sold.

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Sydney Morning Herald:Going greenbusters: environmental savings rejuvenate community

Websites such as freecycle.org and friendswiththings.com.au also help connect people who want to give items away with people who really want them.

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