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BLOG: Living Frugal And Happy

1) Don’t buy what you can get for free
There are many ways to get free things. Your friends and family can give things they don’t need anymore to you, like furniture and clothes. In an increasingly environmental-conscious world websites pop up where people offer things they don’t need anymore, which you can pick up for free, for example freecycle.org. Besides these two great options you can find lots of free stuff through dumpster diving, where you pick up stuff people don’t want anymore. Try it, and you will be surprised what kind of stuff people throw away.

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The Fast Company : Craigslist is quietly changing how much Americans throw away

NEW TO YOU
Craigslist is the best-known website for buying and selling, or simply giving away, used stuff. Others include Freecycle, LetGo, Gumtree, and OLX.

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Internet Scout: The Scout Report Volume 24 Number 25

THE FREECYCLE NETWORK
SOCIAL STUDIES
www.freecycle.org
The familiar slogan “reduce, reuse, recycle” reminds our consumption-driven society to be mindful of our waste, but recycling frequently receives the bulk of the attention. The Freecycle Network (TFN) offers an avenue for the reuse of working items whose current owners no longer need or want them. The way it works is fairly straightforward: after finding their local group and creating a free membership, users can post listings of items they want to give away (items must be “free, legal and appropriate for all ages”), respond to others’ offers of items, or even post a request for an item they’re looking for. TFN’s emphasis on reuse upholds its mission “to build a worldwide sharing movement that reduces waste, saves precious resources & eases the burden on our landfills while enabling our members to benefit from the strength of a larger community.” Following its beginnings as a grassroots organization started by Deron Beal in 2003, TFN is registered as a nonprofit in Arizona and as a charity in the UK. As of this writing, TFN is made up of more than 5,300 local groups run by volunteer moderators in over 110 countries, for a total of more than 9.3 million members worldwide. [JDC

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Marketwatch.com: Retirement isn’t a permanent vacation: Don’t spend your free time spending

“I love the Nextdoor app and Freecycle,” Bursack said. “People use these sites for giving away stuff or swapping things like an old computer. They’re reasonably safe because you’re dealing with neighbors.”

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Your Money: Top money saving tips for students from students

“The amount of money my friends wasted on transport when they needed to get to a lecture was crazy in my eyes. Look on Freecycle to get a bike for free. That’s where I found mine – it just needed new brake pads.”

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AARP: 25 Ways to Save on Shopping

20. Find free recyclables. Join your local chapter at Freecycle.org. Then see if someone wants to give away stuff you are about to buy. The New York City chapter recently listed a free “hardly used” portable crib that cost $60 new.

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Popular Science: Where to find the best free stuff online

FreeCycle is a non-profit organization, currently consisting of more than 9 million members, that aims to make the most of Earth’s limited resources. Part of that involves finding new homes for unwanted stuff, so it doesn’t end up in a landfill. As a result, you can find just about any free item, from televisions to beds for pets, on the free and transparent FreeCycle site.

Because the movement relies on community groups, you’ll want to visit the site and then search for offers in your specific area. Some regions have more activity than others, but unless you’re in a particularly sparsely-populated area, you should be able to find a decent selection.

Like Craigslist, FreeCycle will let you post as well as read others’ entries. So if you’re looking for a specific item, you can ask for it on the site—this type of entry will appear in the “wants” section. If you’re trying to get rid of something, you can post your own offers.

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Resource Magazine: CAN YOU RECYCLE… PLASTIC-PADDED ENVELOPES

Excess envelopes get offered on Freecycle, where it’s not unusual to have half a dozen interested people; many of whom sell items on eBay and are delighted to get free packaging. Once they are past their best, I’m afraid it seems that there is little you can do with Jiffy bags, but at least you can feel good about extending the life of them through reuse.

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ChaddsFordLive.com: Mind Matters: Give and take

To begin the process of remodeling our kitchen, the old was gutted and appliances were going to be thrown away. Donating to Goodwill or other non-profits was not possible — our old kitchen was “too old” despite all being in working condition. Freecycle to the Rescue.

Freecycle is an online listing service sort of like Craig’s List but, as the name implies, “free.” The mission of Freecyle, as quoted in Adam Grant’s book, “Give and Take,” is to “build a worldwide gifting movement that reduces waste, saves precious resources, and eases the burden on our landfills while enabling our members to benefit from the strength of a larger community.”

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BeliefNet: Unique Ways to Finance Holiday Spending

Finally, here is idea I found intriguing. Moneycrashers has this link to a site called FreeCycle Network. Members of the FreeCycle Network post things they are giving away or looking for, and then you basically trade or give things away to specific people.You can get things like a new waffle maker, a computer, golf cart, card board boxes for moving, and more. It just depends on what the members are giving away. The idea is that a local group gives away free items. Obviously, the downside is you don’t know the people when you pick up an item so there are safety concerns. But it all has to be stuff you can legally give away–no drugs, guns, etc. This isn’t for everyone, but it could be for you.

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