Post by Category : “about us”

Moneysavingexpert: 15 MoneySaving tips to beat the summer heatwave

Fancy some free patio furniture? Give Freecycle a go. If you want to give your garden a makeover so you can make the most of the weather, don’t assume you have to spend the earth. Instead try giveaway sites like Freecycle for second-hand patio furniture, parasols, barbecues, paddling pools etc. The free Trash Nothing app can help you scour multiple recycling groups at once – see our Freecyle guide for full help.

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AbilityNet: Tech4Good Awards: Caroline Keppel-Palmer Finalist category: Digital Volunteer of the Year Award

Founder of Museum Freecycle, Caroline is committed to using technology to help the museums reduce their environmental impact. Museum Freecycle is an online network that enables unwanted equipment to be recycled sustainably and easily between museums. It is the first industry-wide Freecycle group in the world and is run voluntarily with no budget. Caroline is based in London and works full time running her e-commerce business, Museum Bookstore, an online store specialising in art books and exhibition catalogues.

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Tucson.com: Conservation and consumption meld at Tucson’s ‘free’ store

The idea for a store where everything is donated and everything is free started with a phone call from Tucson businessman Aaron Polley to his friend Deborah “Debbie” Mitchell.

Mitchell loved the idea from the beginning and signed on immediately.

She called Deron Beal, the brains behind Freecycle.org, a place where people can connect online to offer items they no longer want for free, thus keeping them out of landfills.

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Internet Scout: The Scout Report Volume 24 Number 25

THE FREECYCLE NETWORK
SOCIAL STUDIES
www.freecycle.org
The familiar slogan “reduce, reuse, recycle” reminds our consumption-driven society to be mindful of our waste, but recycling frequently receives the bulk of the attention. The Freecycle Network (TFN) offers an avenue for the reuse of working items whose current owners no longer need or want them. The way it works is fairly straightforward: after finding their local group and creating a free membership, users can post listings of items they want to give away (items must be “free, legal and appropriate for all ages”), respond to others’ offers of items, or even post a request for an item they’re looking for. TFN’s emphasis on reuse upholds its mission “to build a worldwide sharing movement that reduces waste, saves precious resources & eases the burden on our landfills while enabling our members to benefit from the strength of a larger community.” Following its beginnings as a grassroots organization started by Deron Beal in 2003, TFN is registered as a nonprofit in Arizona and as a charity in the UK. As of this writing, TFN is made up of more than 5,300 local groups run by volunteer moderators in over 110 countries, for a total of more than 9.3 million members worldwide. [JDC

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BOOK: Give and Take by Adam Grant

Nice little excerpt from a bestselling book!

Thurston Talk: Thrifty Thurston Scores Free Stuff

Online Postings

The Freecycle Network is a grassroots nonprofit that allows users to post items they intend to give away and browse items offered by others in their local community. Based on a desire to keep good stuff out of landfills, strengthen communities, and instill a spirit of generosity, The Freecycle Network has been serving communities across the globe since 2003, and estimates that they keep over a thousand tons of usable items out of landfills each day. While browsing The Freecycle Network for items in Olympia, I found a pair of zebra finches, a rhododendron bush, baseball cards, a box spring, and a small trampoline being given away for free.

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Your Money: Top money saving tips for students from students

“The amount of money my friends wasted on transport when they needed to get to a lecture was crazy in my eyes. Look on Freecycle to get a bike for free. That’s where I found mine – it just needed new brake pads.”

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Free Malaysia Today:18 things you can receive or donate in ‘Freecycle Malaysia’

The Freecycle Network (TFN) is a non-profit organisation registered in Arizona, US and as a charity in the United Kingdom. TFN coordinates a worldwide network of “gifting” groups to divert reusable goods from landfills.

Freecycling is a combination of two words – free and recycling. The whole idea is to offer items in good condition to other people, for free.

Indirectly, you get to save money and encourage community interaction, too. It’s a great concept.

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The Guardian: Forget profit. It’s love and fun that drive innovations like Parkrun

If you want to get rid of your old table or cot, you might advertise it on your local Freecycle board. The world’s largest nonprofit recycling network, Freecycle has 5,000 gifting groups with 9.4 million members in 110 countries, including the Palestinian Authority. The global HQ for this vast operation is in Tucscon, Arizona, and has a grand total of two employees, including the chief executive. (They share the office with two other nonprofits, and if you ring, the CEO has to go outside so as not to disturb anyone.) They rely on 2,000 or so moderators, who run their boards for their communities for free.

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Dubois County Free Press: New online community helps people share, recycle

new online community designed to help people share stuff for free was recently launched by a Huntingburg resident.

Andrea Himsel decided to create a local FreeCycle group to support the community. She moderates a group on the FreeCycle site called “Huntingburg FreeCycle” although posting on it isn’t limited just to Huntingburg area. All surrounding communities are welcome to become members and use the service.

“I’ll accept members from Dubois, Martin, Crawford, Pike, Daviess, Orange, Spencer, Warrick and Perry Counties,” Himsel said.

It’s just getting started so there aren’t a lot of members yet

FreeCycle is a nonprofit company that launched in 2003 to allow people to connect to share things — household items, advice or help — for free with some semblance of anonymity if so desired.

According to the company’s website, the founder hit upon the idea of the online community while working for a nonprofit that helped businesses recycle unwanted items and equipment. He and other members of the team would approach various local nonprofits to see if they could use the items. They then decided to take the idea of sharing online and launched Freecycle.org through an e-mail group.

Himsel experienced first hand how helpful FreeCycle was to her when she headed to Indiana University after graduating from Jasper High School. She was attracted to using the service because of the recycling it helped to foster but also out of her own personal needs.

“Struggling financially and supporting myself while attending IU, I posted, ‘Wanted: Hard-boiled egg cooker,’” she explained. “I did not get a cooker, but some responses said, ‘Hey, you can just boil them in a regular pot!’”

Seems helpful but then she didn’t have any pots. However, that was remedied quickly with a couple more posts on the Bloomington FreeCycle page.

With pots in hand and eggs boiled, Himsel saw the benefit of the community.

“It was my first apartment my sophomore year and I spent a lot of money buying my textbooks so I started from scratch with my kitchenware,” she explained. “FreeCycle really made it a little easier after being shell-shocked moving from Jasper to Bloomington and experiencing homesickness.”

In addition to pots and pans, Himsel was able to find measuring spoons, dishes and other items needed for someone just getting started on her own as well as a trashcan for a friend. “The majority of what I asked for I received from like-minded people,” she said adding that wasting or trashing something should be a last resort. “Many things can be salvaged and made to look like new again with a little TLC.”

FreeCycle is similar to the free classifieds on Craigslist. It works well because it is moderated and with email, communication is a cinch. “No one will know your real name — only your email address and FreeCycle username — or your address unless you reveal it to them,” Himsel explained.

After becoming a member, you post an “Offer” of something to get for free and meet with a person who requests your item in a mutual location (such as at a park or another public place). Then, when you want to request something, you post a “Wanted” message for all the group’s members and, if someone has that item available, they can send you a message letting you know and you arrange pickup of the item.

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